Protected Content 1

Protected Content 1

ME

A calculation of the remaining energy from the perspective of the object that does work.

Provided by motion, engineered for efficiency.

The Motion energy of the working objects is determined by the object position and potential based on the remaining kinetic energy has on the dynamics of the mechanical internal system and

Summary of Motion Energy Types

(why was vibrational energy or wave energy not included in the list)

I apologize for the oversight, Vibrational energy or wave energy is a form of motion energy. It is the energy associated with the oscillation of a system (molecule, atom, subatomic particle) around its equilibrium position. This energy can be considered as the energy of motion for the oscillating systems, for example, the energy that a string instrument produces is vibrational energy and the energy that a wave produces in the ocean is wave energy.

In summary, I apologize for the oversight, Vibrational energy or wave energy is a form of motion energy. It is the energy associated with the oscillation of a system, such as in sound waves, mechanical waves, and waves of different types.

It should be noted that some of these forms of motion energy are less common or less well-established in physics, and may not be widely used or studied.

  • Rotational energy (the energy an object possesses due to its rotation)
  • Orbital energy (the energy an object possesses due to its orbital motion around another object)
  • Coriolis energy (the energy an object possesses due to the rotation of the Earth)
  • Centrifugal energy (the energy an object possesses due to its motion away from the center of rotation)
  • Inertial energy (the energy an object possesses due to its resistance to changes in motion)
  • Translational energy (the energy an object possesses due to its motion in a straight line)
  • Rotational-translational energy (the energy of an object that is both rotating and moving in a straight line)
  • Non-conservative energy (the energy that is not conserved due to the presence of non-conservative forces)
  • Non-mechanical energy (the energy that is not associated with motion in a mechanical system)
  • Non-electromechanical energy (the energy that is not associated with motion in an electromechanical system)
  • Non-thermodynamic energy (the energy that is not associated with motion in a thermal system)
  • Non-optical energy (the energy that is not associated with motion in an optical system)
  • Non-quantum energy (the energy that is not associated with motion at the atomic and subatomic level)

(list all forms of motion energy)

  • Kinetic energy (the energy an object possesses due to its motion)
  • Thermal energy (the energy associated with the random motion of particles in a substance)
  • Elastic potential energy (the energy an object possesses due to its position within a spring or other elastic material)
  • Sound energy (the energy associated with the vibrations that travel through a medium, such as air or water, to create sound waves)
  • Gravitational potential energy (the energy an object possesses due to its position within a gravitational field)
  • Chemical energy (the energy stored within the bonds of atoms and molecules)
  • Nuclear energy (the energy stored within the nuclei of atoms)
  • Electrostatic energy (the energy associated with the positions and motions of electric charges)
  • Magnetic energy (the energy associated with the positions and motions of magnetic fields)
  • Radiant energy (the energy associated with electromagnetic waves, such as light and radio waves)
  • Gravitational waves (the energy associated with the warping of spacetime caused by massive objects)
  • Tidal energy (the energy associated with the gravitational pull of celestial bodies such as the moon and sun)
  • Nuclear fusion energy (the energy that released when atomic nuclei are fused together, as in the sun)
  • Nuclear fission energy (the energy that is released when atomic nuclei are split apart, as in a nuclear reactor)
  • Hydro kinetic energy (the energy of motion in water, such as in waves, currents, and tides)
  • Wind energy (the energy of motion in the atmosphere, such as in winds)
  • Geothermal energy (the energy of motion in the Earth, such as in heat from the Earth’s core)
  • Bio kinetic energy (the energy of motion in living organisms)
  • Solar energy (the energy of motion in the form of light and heat from the sun)
  • Nuclear energy (the energy of motion in the form of particles and waves emitted by atomic nuclei)
  • Mechanical energy (the energy of motion in machines and other mechanical systems)
  • Electromechanical energy (the energy of motion in electrical and mechanical systems)
  • Acoustic energy (the energy of motion in sound waves)
  • Thermodynamic energy (the energy of motion in thermal systems)
  • Optical energy (the energy of motion in light waves)
  • Quantum energy (the energy of motion at the atomic and subatomic level)

Description of motion energy types:

Momentum energy

An example of when motion energy is momentum energy is a bowling ball rolling down the lane. The bowling ball has momentum energy due to its mass and velocity as it moves down the lane, and this momentum energy is a form of motion energy. As the ball strikes the pins, this motion energy is transferred and causes the pins to move and fall.

This type of motion energy is shared and partially transferred to causes the pins to move, fall and the ball to continue rolling.

When the bowling ball strikes the pins, (some of) the motion energy (momentum energy) is transferred to the pins in the form of kinetic energy, which causes the pins to move and fall. Kinetic energy is the energy an object possesses due to its motion. In this case, as the bowling ball strikes the pins, it imparts some of its kinetic energy to the pins, causing them to move and fall. (While the rest is conserved by the ball to continue in motion?)

Elastic energy

An example of when motion energy is elastic energy is a spring being compressed or stretched. When a spring is compressed or stretched, it stores energy in the form of elastic potential energy. This energy is a form of motion energy because it is related to the movement and position of the spring. When the spring is released, it will move back to its original shape, and the stored energy will be released in the form of kinetic energy.

Vibrational energy

An example of when motion energy is vibrational energy is a guitar string being plucked. When a guitar string is plucked, it vibrates and oscillates at a certain frequency, which is related to the pitch of the note produced. The movement of the string as it oscillates is a form of motion energy, known as vibrational energy. This vibrational energy is converted into sound energy as the string’s oscillations cause the air molecules around it to vibrate, producing sound waves that travel to our ears.

What is the difference between vibrational and wave energy

Vibrational energy and wave energy are similar concepts, but they refer to different types of motion and energy.

Vibrational energy refers to the energy associated with the oscillation of a system around its equilibrium position. For example, a string instrument produces vibrational energy as the strings oscillate to produce sound. The same applies to an atom or molecule that oscillates around its equilibrium position.

Wave energy, on the other hand, refers to the energy associated with the propagation of a disturbance through a medium, such as water, air, or a solid. For example, a wave in the ocean has wave energy as it travels through the water. Similarly, a sound wave has wave energy as it travels through air.

In summary, Vibrational energy is the energy of an object or system that oscillates around a fixed point and Wave energy is the energy that a wave carries as it propagates through a medium.

Motion energy

Theoretically instances Motion energy is electromagnetic energy.

  • Electric fields
  • Magnetic fields
  • Electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays, and gamma rays)
  • Electric current
  • Electric discharge (such as lightning)
  • Electromagnetic waves in plasmas
  • Electromagnetic waves in metamaterials
  • Electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals
  • Electromagnetic waves in graphene
  • Electromagnetic waves in superconductors
  • Electromagnetic waves in left-handed materials
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum vacuum
  • Electromagnetic waves in cosmology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum field theory
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum electrodynamics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum optics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum information science
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum computing
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum cryptography
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum entanglement
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum teleportation
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum error correction
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum simulation
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum metrology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum imaging
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum sensing
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum lithography
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum lithography
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum dot
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum well
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum wire
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nanostructure
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-optics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-electronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-photonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-plasmonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-spintronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-mechanics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-thermodynamics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-fluidics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-photonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-electronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-plasmonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-spintronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-mechanics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-thermodynamics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-fluidics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-optics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-sensing
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-imaging
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-medicine
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-engineering
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-technology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-science
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-physics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-chemistry
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-materials
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanotechnology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanoscience
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanophysics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanochemistry
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanomaterials

Theoretically instances Kinetic energy is electromagnetic energy.

  • Electric current in a wire
  • Electric discharge (such as lightning)
  • Electromagnetic waves in plasmas
  • Electromagnetic waves in metamaterials
  • Electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals
  • Electromagnetic waves in graphene
  • Electromagnetic waves in superconductors
  • Electromagnetic waves in left-handed materials
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum vacuum
  • Electromagnetic waves in cosmology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum field theory
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum electrodynamics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum optics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum information science
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum computing
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum cryptography
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum entanglement
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum teleportation
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum error correction
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum simulation
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum metrology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum imaging
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum sensing
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum lithography
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum dot
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum well
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum wire
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nanostructure
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-optics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-electronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-photonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-plasmonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-spintronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-mechanics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-thermodynamics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-fluidics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-photonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-electronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-plasmonics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-spintronics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-mechanics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-thermodynamics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-fluidics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-optics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-sensing
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-imaging
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-medicine
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-engineering
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-technology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-science
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-physics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-chemistry
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-materials
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanotechnology
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanoscience
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanophysics
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanochemistry
  • Electromagnetic waves in quantum nano-bio-nanomaterials